LEXINGTON—May 1987 graduate of The University of Kentucky Sharin Warnher filed a lawsuit against her alma mater because she could not find a job.  According to the suit, Warnher, who has been job searching for over twenty years, claims that she received a degree under false pretenses and is now seeking reparations for damages.

“My client pursued a bachelor’s degree in anthropology because she was under the impression that it would lead her to gainful employment with a fair salary and benefits,” said John Cohen, the attorney representing Ms. Warnher.  “Instead, she’s been hung out to dry.”

Sharin Warnher ('87) pauses from her job search in this undated photo.

Sharin Warnher (’87) pauses during her job search to take an obviously-staged photo.

Warnher, who graduated with a cumulative  2.7 GPA, is seeking $44,000 (the cost of late 1980s tuition, plus the interest that has accrued on her student loans since then).  She also seeks an unspecified amount from the College of Arts and Sciences for “emotional duress.”

“While it’s unfortunate that Ms. Warnher has been unable to fulfill her vocational calling during these past two decades, we all must realize that her jobless stint has spanned two major economic recessions,” said Francene Gilmer, the Associate Provost for Career Education and Director of UK’s James W. Stuckert Career Center.

Gilmer simply shrugged when asked why she thought Warnher had a hard time finding a job during the 1990s dot com boom.

Warnher claims that she has spent at least 3,300 hours looking for a job, and she remarks that her undergraduate survey courses have had “no real world application.”

“Oh, sure.  I’m a more enlightened citizen, and I can think about the ethical dilemma of the ethnographer in new and complex ways, but when I tried to market myself in our global economy, I came up empty,” Warnher told reporters outside the LFUCG district court.

When asked if other jobless college graduates should sue their alma maters, Warnher agreed vociferously.

“We shell out tuition to make money, not work at MacDonald’s,” she said.

*Note:  College graduates suing their alma mater for damages is a growing trend nationally.